Why Don't We Choose Resveratrol for Anti-aging?

Historical Background of Resveratrol

In the early 21st century, the well-known and respectable scientist David Sinclair conducted extensive research on a molecule called resveratrol, which naturally occurs in many foods such as blueberries, peanuts, grapes, and wine. Professor Sinclair believed that resveratrol possessed "almost miraculous" anti-aging properties in humans.

In 2004, a company called Sirtris Pharmaceuticals was founded dedicated to research of resveratrol. In 2008, the pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) acquired the company for $720 million. However, just two years later, GSK terminated the resveratrol research due to insufficient anti-aging evidence. In 2013, GSK completely shut down the company.

Professor Sinclair's research on resveratrol also led to the controversial belief that red wine has anti-aging effects. In fact, subsequent studies have failed to replicate Sinclair's original findings on resveratrol, and some research suggests that the anti-aging effects observed in animals were due to the fluorescent dye used in the experiments rather than resveratrol itself.

 

Resveratrol in Clinical Trails

Resveratrol,  has been extensively studied for its potential health benefits, particularly in the context of metabolic disorders and aging. However, despite promising preclinical findings, several human clinical trials have failed to demonstrate significant beneficial effects of resveratrol supplementation on various metabolic parameters.

One of the most notable studies in this regard is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted by Timmers et al. (1)

The study involved 41 overweight men and women aged 40-70 years who were randomly assigned to receive either 150 mg/day of resveratrol or a placebo for six months. The primary outcome measure was insulin sensitivity, assessed using the Matsuda index. After six months of supplementation, the researchers found no significant difference in insulin sensitivity between the resveratrol and placebo groups. Although there was a significant difference in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, with lower levels observed in the resveratrol group, particularly in overweight men, the clinical relevance of this finding remains unclear.

Another study by Poulsen et al. (2) investigated the effects of resveratrol supplementation on metabolic syndrome parameters in middle-aged men. The study involved a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design with three treatment arms: placebo, low-dose resveratrol (150 mg/day), and high-dose resveratrol (1000 mg/day). The results showed that neither low nor high doses of resveratrol had beneficial effects on inflammation or metabolic syndrome parameters. Surprisingly, the high-dose resveratrol group exhibited significantly increased levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and fructosamine compared to the placebo group. This research result raises concerns about the adverse effects of high-dose resveratrol.

A review article by Shaito et al. (3) further highlighted the potential adverse effects of resveratrol supplementation. The authors discussed several studies that reported hypersensitivity reactions, alterations in cytokine levels, and changes in blood and liver parameters following resveratrol administration. These findings raise concerns about the safety and potential risks associated with long-term resveratrol supplementation, particularly at higher doses.

In addition to metabolic parameters, resveratrol has also been investigated for its potential effects on other health outcomes, such as prostate cancer and lifespan. A study mentioned in a review by Carrizzo et al. (4)  found no effect of resveratrol on prostate volume or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in prostate cancer patients.

Furthermore, a study discussed in an article by Mankowski et al. (5) reported no effect of resveratrol on lifespan in genetically heterogeneous mice when treatment was initiated at 12 months of age.

While the lack of significant beneficial effects in human trials is disappointing, it is important to note that these findings do not necessarily negate the potential therapeutic value of resveratrol. Several factors, such as bioavailability, dosage, duration of treatment, and study population characteristics, may contribute to the discrepancies between preclinical and clinical findings.

 

Conclusion and BalanceGenics' 12 Rev-Time

While preclinical studies have suggested promising effects of resveratrol on various aspects of metabolic health and aging, several human clinical trials have failed to demonstrate significant beneficial effects of resveratrol supplementation on metabolic parameters, inflammation, cancer markers, and lifespan. These findings highlight the challenges in translating preclinical findings to human studies and underscore the need for larger, well-designed clinical trials to fully evaluate the potential therapeutic applications of resveratrol in humans.

Indeed, that the effects of resveratrol may be more pronounced in specific subpopulations or in combination with other interventions, such as calorie restriction or exercise. After careful consideration and extensive deliberation, our research team have made the choice not to include resveratrol, despite its controversial nature, in the BalanceGenics 12 Rev-Time formula.

Instead, we have opted for Pterostilbene, a compound with proven anti-aging benefits based on experimental data. This decision was reached after thorough analysis of the available scientific evidence and consideration of our commitment to providing the most effective anti-aging solutions to our customers.

Pterostilbene has demonstrated superior anti-aging efficacy in various studies. Our priority remains ensuring the highest quality and efficacy of our products,and we are more than happy to address any inquiries our customers may have.

For more study about Pterostilbene, please see the article below: 

What is Pterostilbene? Why is it better than Resveratrol?

 

 

BalanceGenics 12 Rev-Time is a high-quality supplement designed to reverse the 12 hallmarks of aging. Our scientifically-backed formula aims to help you achieve your health goals while slowing your aging process.

Key Ingredients and Benefits:

  • Calcium Alpha-Ketoglutarate (1000mg /daily): Provides a key metabolite required for cellular energy production, enhancing exercise performance.
  • Quercetin (500mg /daily):
    Supports the immune system and helps clear out senescent "zombie" cells.
  • Pterostilbene (250mg /daily):
    Activates sirtuin proteins that regulate cellular and metabolic processes, maintaining the epigenome.
  • Fisetin (100mg /daily):
    A senolytic compound that removes senescent cells and supports immunity.
  • Spermidine (900mcg /daily):
    A potent inducer of autophagy, enhancing mitochondrial function.

 

For more information, please see BalanceGenics Product page:

BalanceGenics 12 Rev-Time   (Reverse 12 Hallmarks of Aging)

References:

 

 1. Timmers, S., Konings, E., Bilet, L., Houtkooper, R. H., van de Weijer, T., Goossens, G. H., ... & Blaak, E. E. (2011). Calorie restriction-like effects of 30 days of resveratrol supplementation on energy metabolism and metabolic profile in obese humans. Cell metabolism, 14(5), 612-622.

 

2.Poulsen, M. M., Vestergaard, P. F., Clasen, B. F., Radko, Y., Christensen, L. P., Stødkilde-Jørgensen, H., ... & Pedersen, S. B. (2013). High-dose resveratrol supplementation in obese men: an investigator-initiated, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of substrate metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and body composition. Diabetes, 62(4), 1186-1195.

 

3.Shaito, A., Posadino, A. M., Younes, N., Hasan, H., Halabi, S., Alhababi, D., ... & Nasrallah, G. K. (2020). Potential adverse effects of resveratrol: a literature review. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 21(6), 2084.

 

4.Carrizzo, A., Forte, M., Damato, A., Trimarco, V., Salzano, F., Bartolo, M., ... & Vecchione, C. (2013). Antioxidant effects of resveratrol in cardiovascular, cerebral and metabolic diseases. Food and Chemical Toxicology, 61, 215-226.

 

5.Mankowski, R. T., You, L., Buford, T. W., Leeuwenburgh, C., Manini, T. M., Schneider, S., ... & Anton, S. D. (2020). Higher dose of resveratrol elevated cardiovascular disease risk biomarker levels in overweight older adults–A pilot study. Experimental Gerontology, 131, 110821.

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  • Why Don't We Choose Resveratrol for Anti-aging?

    Historical Background of Resveratrol In the early 21st century, the well-known and respectable scientist David Sinclair conducted extensive research on a molecule called resveratrol, which naturally occurs in many foods...

    Why Don't We Choose Resveratrol for Anti-aging?

    Historical Background of Resveratrol In the early 21st century, the well-known and respectable scientist David Sinclair conducted extensive research on a molecule called resveratrol, which naturally occurs in many foods...

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